Micro-credentials: Teacher Leadership to Advance Powerful Student Learning

Advancing Powerful Student Learning in My Classroom

Building Skills:
Focusing on Student Learning: Teachers identify an area of interest to help them look carefully at student learning, analyze results, determine next steps and take action. Using the Student Learning Reflection Cycle protocol, teachers run two cycles of inquiry in their own classrooms as the host teachers.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Focusing on Student Learning, candidates must submit the following evidence:

  • Documentation of two entire Student Learning Reflection cycles, including selected Student Learning Questions, data collection tools, student learning data, considerations of the data and next steps.
  • At the end of the first cycle, if satisfied with the results of the data, teachers will select a new area of interest and Student Learning Question. If not yet satisfied, teachers will design one or more classroom changes and use the same Student Learning Question for the second cycle.
Listening to Student Voice: Students provide teachers feedback through a classroom experience survey and teachers analyze data, determine appropriate next steps and take action.

After receiving the results of their student surveys, teachers choose an area for focused action, develop an action plan to address the area and document both the action and results. After receiving the results of the second administration of the survey, teachers reflect on the process and their learning.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Listening to Student Voice, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Teacher’s identified area(s) of focus with relevant results from the first administration of the survey
  • An action plan for the identified area(s) of focus: What action related to the area of focus will you take in your classroom? Which students will you focus on? (Some or all? A particular class?) What is your timeline for action? (It must be between receiving results from the first administration and before the second administration.)
  • Reflection with data from second administration. Document any changes and learning.
Looking at Student Work: Groups of teachers work together to study and understand the work that students produce and then consider implications.

Teachers share one or more pieces of student work with peers who use a selected protocol and a stance of inquiry to help the presenting teacher think deeply about the work that students produce in his/her classroom. In addition, teachers practice facilitating a similar conversation about one or more pieces of student work that a peer is curious about. The point of the conversations is not to give advice or solve one another’s problems, but rather to gain differing perspectives and new insights about students’ work.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Looking at Student Work, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • At least one piece of student work that has been discussed with peers using a Looking At Student Work protocol (identify the protocol used) along with reflections about the process and the outcome (what next steps the presenting teacher will take as a result).
  • One piece of student work along with the protocol used (and guiding question, if relevant) from a discussion with peers that the teacher facilitated. Include reflections on the process and the work of facilitating the conversation.
Understanding Improvement: Teachers practice using a Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle to improve student learning in their classrooms.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Understanding Improvement, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Two complete tests of classroom-based change ideas (including identified Student Learning Question, predictions, measures and results) using the Plan-Do-Study-Act tracker. The change ideas may address the same Student Learning Question or different ones.
Demonstrating Impact:
Using Improvement Methods to Advance Student Learning: Teachers use a Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle to identify a goal, collect data and test changes in their classrooms that lead to improved student learning.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Using Improvement Methods to Advance Student Learning, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Choose one of the Understanding Improvement PDSAs from above or another PDSA and track relevant data through an annotated run chart with at least 15 data points. This level of data helps to determine the effectiveness of the change over time.
Leading Learning:
Sharing Improvement Strategies to Advance Professional Knowledge: Teachers post the PDSA and related artifacts to a shared site so that other teachers may learn from their results.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Sharing Improvement Strategies to Advance Professional Knowledge, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Send PDSA and run chart along with related artifacts (sample of assignment, student work, instructions, lessons learned, etc.), to be posted on the Schools That Lead website as a resource for other teachers. Agree to answer questions from others interested in your work and learning.
           

Advancing Powerful Student Learning in Peers' Classrooms

Building Skills:
Establishing a Common Aim: Teachers work with peers to craft a relevant and meaningful Student Learning Question and related data collection tool to help them study student learning.

Teachers use the Student Learning Rubric to help a peer select an area of focus and identify or craft a Student Learning Question that is meaningful and relevant. Together, they clarify what the host teacher most wants to understand and then craft a data collection tool that meets the host teacher’s intent in learning.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Establishing a Common Aim, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Three sets of Student Learning Questions and related data collection tools crafted for use in a peer’s classroom
Collecting Data: Teachers work together to gather evidence of student learning based on selected Student Learning Questions:

After Student Learning Questions and data collection tools are selected and designed, teachers visit a peer’s classroom to focus exclusively on gathering the data about student learning that the host teacher is curious about. Visiting teachers may use qualitative (scripting) or quantitative (tallying, mapping, etc.) tools to collect the relevant and requested evidence of student learning.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Collecting Data, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Three sets of student learning data collected from a peer’s classroom (with guiding Student Learning Questions)
Facilitating Peer Reflection: Teachers use a structured protocol to help peers assess where students are relative to the aim and consider next steps to advance powerful student learning.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Facilitating Peer Reflection, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • One video demonstration as the visiting teacher facilitating the Student Learning Reflection protocol.
  • A second video demonstration as the visiting teacher facilitating the Student Learning Reflection protocol after more practice.
  • A short reflection piece answering the following questions:
    • What parts of facilitating the protocol were difficult originally but have gotten easier over time?
    • What parts still remain tricky?
    • As you review the videos, what strikes you about this process? About your role as facilitator?
Demonstrating Impact:
Soliciting Feedback from Peers: Teachers survey peers to gauge the impact of the Student Learning Reflection Cycle on their students’ learning.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Soliciting Feedback from Peers, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Distribute anonymous digital survey to a minimum of four people and follow up as needed to gather information about impact of the Student Learning Reflection Cycle in peers’ classrooms
             

Scaling Powerful Student Learning in My School

Building Skills:
Building Will: Teachers collaborate with twelve colleagues at their school to scale the Student Learning Reflection Cycle.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Building Will, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Names and dates of Student Learning Reflection Cycle classroom visits with four peers (blue dots).
  • Names and dates of Student Learning Reflection Cycle classroom visits with eight more peers (blue dots visiting yellow dots).
Demonstrating Impact:
Measuring Impact on Student Learning: Teachers gather evidence of what happened with student learning in their peers’ classrooms.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Measuring Impact on Student Learning, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • With permission from peers (blue dots), collect a minimum of two cycles of SLRC that demonstrate increased student learning.
  • Submit eight SLRC reflection sheets with Student Learning Question and student learning data included (two cycles x four peers).
Considering Impact on Culture: Teachers use research-based survey items to measure levels of trust and learning among those participating in the Student Learning Reflection Cycle.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Considering Impact on Culture, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Survey the entire learning group (twelve peers – blue dots and yellow dots) at the beginning of the team’s work together. Survey again six months later.
  • Note trends and themes that seem significant to the team.
Leading Learning:
Building Skills in Others: Teachers teach peers the structured process of the Student Learning Reflection Cycle and facilitate their learning groups.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Building Skills in Others, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Agendas of meetings of group of five (blue dots) and group of 13 (blue dots and yellow dots).
  • At the end of the school year, administer a survey to the entire group measuring confidence in the skills of observing student learning and facilitating peer reflection.
Sharing Learning: Teachers present the learning of their group of peers to external audiences through conferences, district meetings, Board meetings or other settings to advance understanding.

In order to earn the micro-credential for Sharing Learning, candidates must submit the following evidence:
  • Relevant artifacts of conference presentation, including but not limited to session description, photos, Board agenda
  • Synopsis of presentation
             
Instructions for submission: